Dance, as we know it today, has evolved into a tremendously popular aesthetically pleasing form of entertainment. It merges with other forms of art to create one master piece, a sort of melting pot of art. Before the time of Diaghilev and the Ballet Russe, dancing was not nearly as exciting and stimulating to watch, much less as popular. In the mere twenty years of its existence, "the Ballet Russe accomplished more in the development of the art form than any single institution in history."
Established in 1909, the Ballet Russe was successful from the very beginning. Not only did the ballets have beautiful choreography by brilliant choreographers such as Fokine, but also had willing and talented artists and musicians completing the package. This influenced society immensely, from fashion to the way art was appreciated. For example, the colorful settings in Sheherazade made by Leon Bakst, inspired the new "Oriental" look in home decorating and in clothes. Now famous painters such as Picasso, Braque, Rouault, and Matisse got clear exposure to the public eye in their set designs and paintings, peaking interest in new forms of visual art. All of this of course, would have never happened if it wasn't for Diaghilev. Frustrated with his failing law career, he dove into the world of painting and poetry by editing a journal which discussed the latest works. After supervising some productions with the Russian Imperial Theater, which he was dismissed from, Diaghilev finally found his niche, an impresario-producer of ballets. Of course, not coming from ballet training, he approached this job from the musical and artistic perspective, how to make the show better. His main vision was that "classical ballet should represent a more timely, natural, and unified style of movement, plot, music, and painting reflective of the twentieth century." With this in mind, Diaghilev went on to make dozens of productions; Le…